HomePage
WHO WE ARE CONTACTS WORK WITH US PARTNERS & AGENTS BENEFITS SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENT AFFILIATION
TRAINING PROGRAMMES
OUR
COURSES

BUSINESS TRAINING
SCHOOL PROGRAMMES
ITALIAN FOR FOREIGNERS
EXAMS & OTHER LANGUAGES
STUDY TRIPS ABROAD
TRANSLATIONS & INTERPRETING
spacer spacer spacer spacer spacer spacer spacer spacer
Customised projects
SCHOOL PROGRAMMES
TAILOR-MADE COURSES
CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES
EXTRACURRICULAR COURSES
DRAMA LAB
CLIL
SUMMER CAMP
STUDENT SUPPORT
DYSLEXIC LEARNERS
SCHOOL TRIPS
GROUP STAYS
INTERNSHIP





 

Language Point Learning Resource Centre

Learning with diagnosed difficulties: dyslexia

No two people with dyslexia are affected the same, however some general conditions can be expected and addressed with general standards to encourage and motivate the affected person. Underlying factors almost always seem to be fatigue, frustration, low self-confidence. Recognise and embrace the challenge – how does the challenge specifically affect the person’s school work, concentration, interaction with peers, level of confidence? Accept that there is no magic solution, however small modifications/allowances in our learning environments can be made to ensure “dyslexia-aware/dyslexic-friendly” conditions:

-printing on pastel paper, blue ink
-integrating full multi-sensory approach
-using yellow transparent paper to cover printed work
-creating work stations to help strengthen the power of  learner’s association
 
     
What we’ve found: more than anything, the students need to be encouraged and helped in their search to find the learning method that works best for them. English is the context, but we’re really facilitating activities that work to build and strengthen the students’ self-worth and confidence. Doing these communicative activities, the student naturally improves in their study of English and in all other subjects.  The fact that the context is English seems special;  a secret, understandable language and activity set! The students become enamored with the language because of this and seem to develop a life-long learning relationship with it. 

 

FAQ:

 

Why do dyslexic learners often have problems with reading and writing?

  • Dyslexic learners seem to process written and spoken language differently.
  • They are usually not aware of separate sounds in words (lack of phonological awareness) and may not perceive the symbols (letters) that make up words on a page as real or meaningful (visual processing difficulty).
  • Even dyslexic learners who are good at reading may have difficulty with small confusable words.
  • Dyslexic learners are often visual thinkers and need to link words to images to make them memorable.
  • Dyslexic learners may have problems tracking print and reading black print off a white page.

In the classroom: Do I have to teach the dyslexic student differently?

Yes, if what you are doing isn't working - as with any student. However, fortunately, the best way to teach dyslexic students is the best way to teach the whole class.

Multi-sensory teaching methods are the best.
In the classroom, students are likely to learn mainly through three senses:

  • visual
  • auditory - speaking and listening
  • kinaesthetic - through doing a task: handwriting, cutting/pasting, modelling

All teaching sessions should provide opportunities to learn through these three channels as students will have their own preferred learning style.

 

How can I help with reading?

  • enable students to read off coloured paper or use a coloured overlay: yellow and blue are useful but preference will be individual. Cerium Visual Technologies is a good source of coloured overlays, www.ceriumvistech.co.uk,
  •  use coloured plastic wallets cut up, from any stationers
  • Use tracking exercises. Make up your own sentence tracking sheets on topical matters.
    An example tracking exercise can be found in the 'Reading' seciton of the Skillswise 'Lessonplans' area.
    (Ann Arbor Publishing Limited also produce tracking material, www.annarbor.co.uk)
  • Encourage students with tracking difficulties to use a line guide: coloured perspex ruler or similar, or card cut out to the correct size of the column to be read. (This helps with reading newsprint.)

Presentation of text is very important:

  • use a sans serif font: Arial, Tahoma, Comic Sans
  • make headings stand out
  • do not capitalise first word on a line, unless grammatically necessary
  • do not justify right-hand margins
  • space information clearly
  • use 14 font minimum
  • use colour and appropriate images to help student find information easily
  • box information to make it stand out
  • do not try to fit too much information on a page
  • do not double-side; use two separate sheets (even if it is bad for the environment)
  • do not write all in capitals; lower case words are easier to read.

 

How can I help with spelling?

Ways to anchor spellings

(All solutions are best thought out by the student with tutor help if necessary.)

  • Try a picture of 1 Coffee and 2 Sugars (1 'c' and 2 's's)
  • Look at the part the student gets wrong; get them to highlight it
  • Use colour to break words into syllables: sep ar ate. (Use 'How many times your chin drops' to count syllables. Some students cannot hear syllables.)
  • Find words within words and link with an image: bus in ess
  • Teach root words then prefix and suffix: re member ing
  • Change the look of the word div / ide     d ivi de
  • 'Difficult to spell' address words can be given an image and modelled (3D) in clay with the word in clay (lower-case) underneath the model. e.g. one student represented the word 'avenue' by modelling two lines of trees with an arrow in between, pointing to the word 'avenue' modelled in clay in lower-case letters.
  • Encourage students to visualise whenever they try to spell a word.
  • For kinaesthetic learners get them to trace, write and/or model words many times.
  • Say the word wrongly (for old chestnuts like 'Wed nes day').
  • do not teach homophone/homonyms together e.g. 'where' and 'were'. Teach in families instead e.g. here, where, there.

Colour and image are the best tools to work with.

How can I help with writing?

Dyslexic students are understandably reluctant writers. They worry predominantly about spelling.

  • TELL THEM NOT TO WORRY ABOUT SPELLING.
  • Give them stimulating, real-life, relevant things to write about.
  • Use discussion, whole class planning, brainstorming on the board.
  • Use a variety of planning tools: Mind Maps, flow charts, writing frames.
  • No one writes a perfect first draft.
  • Be enthusiastic/inspirational. You will initially be the source of their confidence.
  • Entry level spelling does not mean the content of the writing will be Entry level.
  • Keyboarding can be a multi-sensory activity: look at the word, say the letters as your fingers do the typing.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/tutors/expertcolumn/dyslexia/page4.shtml

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Icona File Link
Visualizza allegato BDA_Training Education Brochure
Visualizza allegato Learner Learning Difficulties
Visualizza allegato Demystifying Dyslexia
Visualizza allegato Dyslexia Teacher Training_20 hrs
Where we are | Accommodation in Milan | Prices | Download | Faq | Request information |
RESOURCES AND SERVICES FOLLOW US ON DOWNLOADS ACCREDITATIONS & PARTNERSHIPS
Library
Services and facilities
Free time
Facebook
LinkedIn
Twitter
Manual 231 /ex d.Lgs. 231/2001
Ethic code
Training offer
Rules of procedures
How to register and pay
PARTNERSHIP Ministero dell'Istruzione, dell'Universita' e della Ricerca

 

 

 

 

 

LANGUAGE POINT  | r.e.a. milano n. 1729387 |  vat no. 04032050967

MILANO § Piazza Aspromonte n. 35 - 20131 Milan - Italy │T +39 02 29521559 │M +39 3465028947 │ F +39 02 87387922 │ info@languagepoint.eu │skype: language.point  │ ROZZANO - Viale Liguria (c/o Scuola Media Luini Falcone) §  OPERA - Via Carducci 13 (c/o Istituto Ponti )

LanguagePoint©all rights reserved │ Graphic Designer Umberto Aloi │written by ivana rita perego